Scott Magelssen

Canadian Theatre Review
Volume 159, Summer 2014
http://bit.ly/PMctr159

Also available at CTR Online

Digital Performance

Edited by Peter Kuling and Laura Levin

CTR 159 focuses on the vibrant experimentations with digital technology that are taking place within the performance field. In line with CTR’s interest in covering new directions in theatre, the issue explores how digital technologies are leading performance into new physical and virtual spaces. Plays are now routinely staged online and on social media platforms; site-specific shows use cellphone texting on city streets; and players engage in complex performances of self in the imaginative worlds of video games. CTR 159 stresses the social and political dimensions of theatrical encounters with “new” technologies and interrogates the role digital media plays in providing individuals from historically marginalized communities with DIY forms of self-expression.

Scripts featured in this issue include LANDLINE: From Halifax to Vancouver by Dustin Harvey and Adrienne Wong, a cellphone performance experienced simultaneously by spectators on opposite sides of the country, and How iRan: Three Plays for iPod by Ken Cameron, a shuffleable audio play on imprisoned Iranian-Canadian blogger Hossein Derakhshan.

The issue also features excerpts from the theatrical experiments of Praxis Theatre—such as Section 98, an open source play that invites audiences to respond electronically to the show as it develops—and a slideshow surveying the use of digital technologies by theatre companies from across Canada.

For more information about the Canadian Theatre Review, please visit us at www.canadiantheatrereview.com

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Modern Drama Volume 57, Number 2 /2014
http://bit.ly/572smd

This issue contains:

The Chronotopic Dynamics of Ibsen’s Pillars of Society: The Triumph of Industrialism, or How Drama Becomes History
Erinç Özdemir
http://bit.ly/572amd

Ventriloquist Theatre and the Omniscient Narrator: Gatz and El pasado es un animal grotesco
Barbara Fuchs
http://bit.ly/572bmd

Parody, E.E. Cummings, and Uncle Tom’s Cabin
James M. Cherry
http://bit.ly/572cmd

“A Little History Here, a Little Hollywood There”: (Counter-)Identifying with the Spanish Fantasy in Carlos Morton‘s Rancho Hollywood and Theresa Chavez’s L.A. Real
Courtney Elkin Mohler
http://bit.ly/572dmd

“Remove Your Mask”: Character Psychology in Introspective Musical Theatre – Sondheim’s Follies, LaChiusa’s The Wild Party, and Stew’s Passing Strange
Alisa Roost
http://bit.ly/572emd

Rethinking Sarah Kane’s Characters: A Human(ist) Form and Politics
Louise LePage
http://bit.ly/572fmd

Reviews
http://bit.ly/572gmd

Sean Carney, The Politics and Poetics of Contemporary English Tragedy, reviewed by Lily Cui

Leslie Atkins Durham, Women’s Voices on American Stages in the Early Twenty-First Century: Sarah Ruhl and Her Contemporaries, reviewed by Miriam Chirico

Siyuan Liu, Performing Hybridity in Colonial-Modern China, reviewed by Jen-Hao Hsu

Carol Martin, Theatre of the Real, reviewed by Liz Tomlin

Vassiliki Rapti, Ludics in Surrealist Theatre and Beyond, reviewed by Johanna Malt

Liz Tomlin, Acts and Apparitions: Discourses on the Real in Performance Practice and Theory, 1990-2010, reviewed by Miriam Felton-Dansky

Sara Warner, Acts of Gaiety: LGBT Performance and the Politics of Pleasure, reviewed by Jessica Del Vecchio

Maurya Wickstrom, Performance in the Blockades of Neoliberalism: Thinking the Political Anew, reviewed by Jason Fitzgerald

Modern Drama was founded in 1958 and is the most prominent journal in English to focus on dramatic literature. The terms “modern” and “drama” are the subject of continuing and fruitful debate, but the journal has been distinguished by the excellence of its close readings of both canonical and lesser-known dramatic texts from a range of methodological perspectives. The journal features refereed articles written from a variety of geo-political points of view which enhance our understanding, both formal and historical, of the dramatic literature of the past two centuries; there is also an extensive book review section.

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cover-mediumBurlesque

Edited by Shelley Scott and Reid Gilbert

CTR#158 offers an extended conversation about burlesque in Canada, from archival photos and historical contextualization to the most current interpretations of what neo-burlesque can be and what it can do. The audacious urban experience of Montreal lives beside the off-the-grid exuberance of Lasqueti Island. The details of costume construction in ancouver are considered alongside legal definitions that dictatecostumes in Calgary.

The issue offers an in-depth exploration of Toronto’s Operation Snatch, formerly The Scandelles, with two articles that chart the company’s trajectory from burlesque to political cabaret, a Scandelles script, and an interview with founder Alexandra Tigchelaar. Also exclusively online, Adriana Disman has curated a dialogue among socially conscious performers using neo-burlesque for social change. Whether conveying the experience of a male burlesque performer or drawing parallels with the community-building appeal of roller derby, the authors in this issue dissect, interrogate, and expand the definitions of burlesque.

Click here to read the editorial and view the full table of contents.

 

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The Haunted Stage of Summer and Smoke: Tennessee Williams’s Forgotten Silent Film Sequences 
Sophie Maruéjouls-Koch

Recent re-evaluation of Tennessee Williams’s late plays has brought to light another side of the playwright, an avant-garde impulse ignored by his contemporaries because it did not match his image as a poetic realist. Read more… 

Mac Wellman’s Antigone: The Hegelian Theme
Michael Shaw

Mac Wellman, the contemporary American playwright, has said that there is a lot of George Steiner’s Antigones (where Steiner discusses the influence of Sophocles’s play on later writers and philosophers) in his Antigone of 2000. Read more… 

The Philippine Komedya and the Recuperation of the Cosmopolitan: From Colonial Legacy to Cross-Cultural Encounter
Sir Anril P. Tiatco

This article critiques the komedya vis-à-vis its institutionalization as national theatre form and proposes a cosmopolitan alternative in the critique. Read more… 

From Laundries to Labour Camps: Staging Ireland’s “Rule of Silence” in Anu Production’s Laundry
Miriam Haughton

Anu Productions premiered their site-specific devised performance Laundry in the former Magdalene Laundry building on Lower Seán McDermott Street, as part of their four-part artistic investigation of this historical city centre district at the 2011 Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival. Read more… 

Tragedy and Theatricality in The Island
Christian Dahl

The article discusses the theoretical and generic problems of defining classical and modern tragedy vis à vis contemporary re-adaptations of Greek tragedy. Read more… 

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Complete Modern Drama Online archive now available!
Modern Drama‘s complete archive of regular and special themed issues – including over 3000 articles and reviews, from 1958 to present – is now available online.

This comprehensive electronic resource of dramatic literature is now available at: Project MUSE  and  Modern Drama Online

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CTR 157 / Winter 2014 “Alternative Globalizations” 

Edited by Barry Freeman and Catherine Graham

This issue examines ways in which Canadian theatre companies and performers are working to create an alternative sense of what globalization could mean. The issue looks especially at how Canadian artists are connecting to those in other countries, creating horizontal networks of performance that function outside the logic of market-based consumption to make the flow of globalization visible. It aims to re-envision what it might mean to participate as a citizen, rather than simply as a consumer, in an increasingly globalized flow of performances, and what this emphasis on the global could mean for our understanding of Canadian theatre. Topics discussed include Occupy Newfoundland; Debajehmujig Theatre’s/Global Savages/project; Théâtre Parminou’s collaboration with French and Belgian theatre companies to produce a series of plays on how we measure wealth; Théâtre des Petites Lanternes’ international participatory Théâtre Citoyen projects; Canadian responses to the war in Afghanistan; and discussions of how local and global concerns are linked in new performance works by Human Cargo, Theatre Company Teesri Duniya Theatre, and Le Sensorium.

Click here to read the editorial and view the full table of contents.

 

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The joint Association for Theatre in Higher Education/American Society for Theatre Research Subcommittee on Non-Print Publishing, convened last year by Bob Schanke, Chair of ATHE’s Committee on Research and Publications, recommends that digital scholarship be included as a legitimate indicator of achievement in hiring, tenure, and promotion in theatre and performance studies. Furthermore, it recommends that our organizations celebrate and promote excellence in digital scholarship in our conferences and publications.

The subcommittee shared its recommendations in the form of a white paper, presented at the ATHE conference in Orlando in August, and submitted to the ASTR Executive Committee this fall. ATHE and ASTR are currently in the process of vetting the recommendations.

The white paper can be viewed by clicking on this link:

http://www.athe.org/associations/12588/files/13NonPrintWhitePaper.pdf

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CTR 155 / Summer 2013

Edited by Pil Hansen with Darcey Callison and Bruce Barton

Taking the temperature of the field, this issue offers unprecedented insight into a broad range of dance and movement dramaturgy positions in Canada and beyond. The contributions are written by artists and artist-scholars from across the country who share a deep investment in dramaturgy, and whose voices are brought together for the first time to articulate strategies, approaches, and choices. Elizabeth Langley, Katya Montaignac, Jacob Zimmer, Heidi Taylor, Guy Cools, and Carol Anderson, among others, elaborate on the role of dramaturgs from within the lengthy and complex process of creating dance and movement-based material. Their reflections involve dramaturgs’ development of creative strategies, their awareness of the relationship between approaches to generation and emerging compositional possibilities, their grounding in the training, strengths, and limitations of the dancers, and their acute sensitivity to interpersonal relationships and modes of perception. Their insights are further enriched by two dramaturgy-driven performance recipes/texts: Adaptation Project by Michael Trent and Dancemakers and Transmission by Tanya Marquardt.

Click here for free access to the editorial and view the table of contents.

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CTR 153 / Winter 2013

Edited by Laura Levin and Belarie Zatzman

This is the first issue of CTR to address the development and production of performances in Canada that are rooted in the Jewish experience. Artists and scholars re-imagine traditional representations of Jewish culture, history, and ritual and highlight the diverse forms that Jewish performance has taken in contemporary Canadian contexts: from plays on Jewish themes, to site-specific Jewish theatre, to Yiddish parades, to queer re-stagings of religious practice, to intermedia installations of mythic Jewish spaces. Many contributors explore Jewish identity as a performance that takes place both on and offstage; in so doing, they resist fixed understandings of what it means to be Jewish, and explore Jewish identity as it is formed through multiple affiliations, alliances, and communities. In narrating questions of self-definition, they ask how Jewish performance intersects with other diasporic communities to create new intercultural forms, and they investigate the importance of Jewish performance practices that actively negotiate cultural inequities and socio-political realities.

Click here to read the introduction and view the table of contents.

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CTR 152

Costumes are perhaps the least ephemeral element of a performance – how we come to think of them is the theme. This issue is unique as it features a portfolio of costume design research by François Barbeau, rather than a script. Full colour images with remarks by Barbeau narrate aspects of his research of costume materials at the Cirque du Soleil Research and Development lab. The nine featured articles emphasize the designing, making, wearing, and exhibiting of costumes. Interviews maintain ongoing dialogues with performance: design practice for First Nations performance; designing as collaborative dramaturgy; conceptualizing a Queen Mas for the Caribbean Carnival; wearing costumes at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival; and creating and managing the costume wardrobe for the Vancouver Olympics. Alongside these interviews are reflections on the process of bringing costumes out of performance and into the exhibition hall, without replacing actors by mannequins. Notes from the technological animation of the “catwalk” for Jean Paul Gaultier’s retrospective show affinities between performance and displays of fashion design. The issue is rounded out by advocacy to confront the status of designers in the contractual relations of professional theatre in Canada.

 

Click here to read the introduction and view the table of contents.

 

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Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights. NYU Press, 2011

  • Flynn, Richard. “Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights.” The Lion and the Unicorn, 36.2, April 2012. available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Bak, Meredith A.. “Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights. Robin Bernstein. New York: New York University Press, 2011. 318 pp. $22.80 paperback.” Journal of Popular Culture*, v. 45 issue 4, 2012, p. 913.
  • Melancon, T.C. “Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights.” Choice 6/2012 Vol. 49, issue 10 p.1854.

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