Scott Magelssen

MD_59_2_cover_CV_Ok.pdf

Modern Drama, 59:2, Summer 2016, “Aging and the Life Course

Also available online

This issue of Modern Drama brings together major scholars in the fields of age studies, theatre history, and performance studies to examine how theatre, as an embodied art that unfolds over time, can both model and challenge narratives, affects, and cultural understandings (and misunderstandings) about aging. Modern drama and gerontology echo each other most directly in their search for new structures that might accommodate the pluralism and specificity of the entire life course. According to the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 12.3 per cent of the global population was aged 60 or over in 2015; by 2050, that figure is estimated to grow to 21.5 per cent. Each of the six new essays in this issue considers how theatre, as an art that grafts flesh to figures, helps us to imagine growing older, caring for an aging population, dementia, and “successful aging” in an era when more people will live longer than they ever have in human history.

Click here to view the full table of contents.

Thank you,

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Andrew Sofer. Dark Matter: Invisibility in Drama, Theater, and Performance (Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2013).

  • W.B. Worthen, Theatre Journal 66 (2014): 495-496. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Ariel Watson, Modern Drama 57 (2014): 445-447. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Fran Teague, Comparative Drama 49 (2015): 228-230. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Lawrence Manley, TDR 59 (2014): 186-87. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Dean Wilcox, Theatre Research International 40 (2015): 130-131. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Peter Womack, Theatre Survey 56 (2015): 111-113. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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John Fletcher. Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013.

  • Hank Willenbrink. “Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age.” Theatre Journal 67.1 (March, 2013). p. 412. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Jeanie C. Crain.”Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age.”  Journal of American Culture 38.3 (September, 2015). pp.308-309. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Peter Civetta. “Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age by John Fletcher, and: Sensational Devotion: Evangelical Performance in Twenty-First Century America by Jill Stevenson (review).” TDR 59.4 (Winter 2015) T228. pp. 194-197. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Deborah A. Dougherty.”Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age by John Fletcher and Sensational Devotion: Evangelical Performance in Twenty-First Century America by Jill Stevenson.” Theatre Survey 56.3 (September, 2015). pp. 443-446. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

  • J. Fisher. “The Cambridge companion to theatre history, ed. by David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski.” Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries. 51.3 (November, 2013). p.471. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Maggie B. Gale. “Wiles, David and Dymkowski, ChristineThe Cambridge Companion to Theatre History.” New Theatre Quarterly 30.4 (November, 2014) 404-405. Available online [may require subscriber login]
  • Scott Magelssen. “The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History.” TDR 58.4/T224 (Winter 2014). Available online [may require subscriber login]

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Ann Folino White. Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2015.

  • Michael Schwartz.  “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White (review).” Theatre Journal 67.4 (December, 2015). pp.758-59. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Todd Holmes. “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White (review).” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 114.1 (Winter 2016). pp. 122-124. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • J. Chris Westgate. “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White.” Journal Of American History 102.3 (December, 2015). pp.917-918. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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Dwight Conquergood. Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis. Edited by E. Patrick Johnson. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013.

  • Laurie Frederik. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” Theatre Journal 66.4 (December 2014) p. 344. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Renée Alexander Craft. Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” TDR 59.1 (Spring 2015) (T225). Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Scott Irelan. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” Choice Reviews Dec 2013. Available online  [may require subscriber login].
  • Bryant Keith Alexander. “Books in Performance Studies: Reviews and Reflections (review essay).” Text and Performance Quarterly 34.4 (October, 2014). pp. 416-433. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Norman K. Denzin. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, auth. and E. Patrick Johnson, ed. (review).” American Anthropologist 116.3 (September, 2014) pp. 676-677. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Hari Stephen Kumar. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis. Dwight Conquergood, (edited by E. Patrick Johnson).”Anthropology & Education Quarterly 45.4 (2014) pp.415-417. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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MD_58_4_2015

Modern Drama, Volume 58, Number 4, Winter 2015 is now available at Modern Drama Online and Project MUSE.

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CTR_164_Fall_2015_(3X3)NOW AVAILABLE AT CTR ONLINE  –  CTR 164, Fall 2015 “Vancouver after 2010”

Also available on Project MUSE 

A startling correspondence across former Olympic and Paralympic host cities is that aggressive social welfare cuts have followed the event. These cuts have serious material consequences for those very artists and minority groups that proved so central to winning bids and staging Opening and Closing ceremonies. Five years after the 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, with the city’s arts communities still recovering from a series of provincial funding cuts that actually began in 2009, and with post-Olympics development projects encroaching on artist live-work spaces, this special issue of Canadian Theatre Reviewbrings together scholars, artists, and cultural producers to ask what kinds of resources remain after a mega-event has left town? How do artists and companies adapt to new economic circumstances and leverage audience attention for and investment in new projects? And what might a reading of the specific aesthetic, social, and affective legacies of different Olympics- and Paralympics-related performances tell us about the state of arts and culture in Vancouver today? From public art and sound walks, to hockey games and real estate speculation, this issue reveals the pervasive power of the Olympics to continue to shape how Vancouverites move through and live within the city. Fix, the published script by award-winning playwright Alex Bulmer, demonstrates how citizens of host cities from Vancouver to London must continually renew the fight to the right to the city. Bulmer’s “audio provocation” seeks to engage youth in the deep questions of citizenship, particularly concerning disability and inclusion. Her script is one of many battle cries in this issue that show art and performance to be more than a stage for official culture, but a political force with which to be reckoned.

Click here to read the full introduction.

You can also access CTR on the various online platforms below.

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CTR_163_SUMMER2015_100 DPI

CTR 163 (Summer 2015)
Performance Futures: Imagining Theatre in 2030

Edited by Jenn Stephenson and Laura Levin

Also available on Project MUSE

CTR 163 (Summer 2015): Performance Futures: Imagining Theatre in 2030, edited by Jenn Stephenson and Laura Levin, explores very recent innovations in theatre and performance, and asks what they can tell us about where the field is headed. Focusing on new formats of theatrical production and reception, contributors have been invited to answer the question: “What will the performance landscape in Canada look like in fifteen years?” This is not theatre in a distant sci-fi future but theatre that is just around the corner. The assembled collection brings together voices that are passionate and visionary, and address such disparate topics as the future of theatre in online venues, the future of interculturalism and cultural diversity in theatre, the future of theatre funding, and the future of theatre criticism. The script featured in this issue is Concord Floral, winner of the 2015 Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding New Play. Written by Governor General Award-winning playwright Jordan Tannahill, and co-created with acclaimed artists Erin Brubacher and Cara Spooner along with a group of exceptional Toronto teens, this powerful text exhibits alternative ways of representing the lives of tomorrow’s youth as well as more ecologically responsive human futures. Concord Floral is accompanied by an arresting series of staged photo-portraits by Erin Brubacher, which help reconceptualize the boundaries of a theatrical script and production.

Click here to read the full table of contents.

For more information about the Canadian TheatreReview or for submissions information, please contact:

Canadian Theatre Review
University of Toronto Press, Journals Division
5201 Dufferin Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T8, Canada
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This spring (2015) I led a graduate seminar in the Center for Performance Studies at the University of Washington called “Emerging Discourses in Theatre and Performance Studies.” Throughout the ten-week term, we discussed readings in three areas: Ecocriticism, the Cognitive Sciences, and Affect Theory. Each of these areas represented discursive “turns,” that is, conversations that have emerged fairly recently in our fields and do not seem to be going away soon. The goal for the seminar, then, was for the students to become familiar with these discourses, so that they would be at the very least conversant with them in reading and at conferences, and, even better, equipped with “tool belts” of helpful concepts and resources for their own research.

We devoted roughly three weeks to a crash-course in each area, reading essays from special journal issues and collections and discussing them in the seminar. One of the benefits of taking on contemporary scholarly conversations was that when we had questions or confusions about particular concepts or arguments, we could contact many of the working scholars in the field to ask them directly, and our colleagues in the field were generous, thoughtful and timely in their responses. At the end of each unit, the students compiled a working inventory of provocative key terms and concepts that gave some shape to the conversation and that could serve as indexes for future term papers, dissertation chapters, conference presentations and publications.

Attached are .pdf files of our inventories, along with a syllabus for the course. We hope they might be useful springboards for a larger collective of scholars engaged in these conversations.

Additions, corrections, and suggestions are welcome in the comments section, below.

 

Seminar Participants: Monica Cortés-Viharo (Drama), Jay Eckard (Drama), Duygu Erdoğan Monson (Drama), Storm S. Sundberg (Dance), Robert Wighs (Drama). With thanks to Monica Cortés-Viharo for transcribing and organizing the inventories, and to Rhonda Blair, Amy Cook, Baz Kershaw, and Theresa May.

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