Scott Magelssen

ctr-167-cover

NOW AVAILABLE AT CTR ONLINE  –  CTR 167, Summer 2016 “Funding”

Also available on Project MUSE

Can you put a price tag on art? How much is an artist worth? CTR 167 Funding, edited by Nicholas Hanson, follows the money, tracking the financial wellbeing of the Canadian performing arts network. From coast to coast to coast, our nation’s theatre artists are facing increasingly precarious living and working conditions. Nevertheless, artists and arts organizations are demonstrating imagination and innovation in the conception and implementation of new ways to pay the bills. In 2016, the Canada Council for the Arts will implement the most transformative changes in their history; this issue is perfectly timed to explore the unspoken realities about artistic labour, the complicated notions of accessibility, and the creative solutions for the future.

This issue critiques governmental policies and organizational structures, but never loses sight of the fact that arts funding isn’t an abstract topic—access to money (or lack thereof) impacts individual people in deeply personal ways. With dynamic contributions from a group of established and emerging voices, CTR 167 features lively conversations, insightful articles, and whimsical provocations. An eclectic range of topics includes an interrogation of Justin Trudeau’s promises, a program that offers free theatre tickets, and the impact of Vancouver’s real estate market. Financial literacy might seem like a subject reserved for mature adults, but this issue’s script—The Money Tree by Robert Watson—proves otherwise. Originally produced by Roseneath Theatre, the play has toured to hundreds of elementary schools, sparking playful ideas about money, greed, and responsibility.

The online slideshow documents some of the inventive methods used by artists and organizations to fund their projects despite challenging financial circumstances. Organized in three parts the slideshow focuses on creative approaches to performance venues, novel project-based fundraising techniques, and celebrates the artist-activists who’ve protested funding cutbacks and theatre closings across the nation.

Click here to view the full table of contents.

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Please sign up for important news relating to Canadian Theatre Review. You’ll receive emails with peeks inside new issues, Tables of Contents, Calls for Papers, editorial announcements, open access articles, and special offers. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking “Unsubscribe” in the footer of our emails. Sign up herebit.ly/ctralerts

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Modern Drama, 59:3, Fall 2016 is now available at MD Online and Project MUSE – Read the issue today!

Join MD email list!
Please sign up for important news relating to Modern Drama. You’ll receive emails with peeks inside new issues, Tables of Contents, Calls for Papers, editorial announcements, open access articles, and special offers. Sign up here – bit.ly/mdalerts

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Modern Drama, 59:2, Summer 2016, “Aging and the Life Course

Also available online

This issue of Modern Drama brings together major scholars in the fields of age studies, theatre history, and performance studies to examine how theatre, as an embodied art that unfolds over time, can both model and challenge narratives, affects, and cultural understandings (and misunderstandings) about aging. Modern drama and gerontology echo each other most directly in their search for new structures that might accommodate the pluralism and specificity of the entire life course. According to the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 12.3 per cent of the global population was aged 60 or over in 2015; by 2050, that figure is estimated to grow to 21.5 per cent. Each of the six new essays in this issue considers how theatre, as an art that grafts flesh to figures, helps us to imagine growing older, caring for an aging population, dementia, and “successful aging” in an era when more people will live longer than they ever have in human history.

Click here to view the full table of contents.

Thank you,

AUDREY GREENWOOD

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Andrew Sofer. Dark Matter: Invisibility in Drama, Theater, and Performance (Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2013).

  • W.B. Worthen, Theatre Journal 66 (2014): 495-496. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Ariel Watson, Modern Drama 57 (2014): 445-447. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Fran Teague, Comparative Drama 49 (2015): 228-230. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Lawrence Manley, TDR 59 (2014): 186-87. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Dean Wilcox, Theatre Research International 40 (2015): 130-131. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Peter Womack, Theatre Survey 56 (2015): 111-113. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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John Fletcher. Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013.

  • Hank Willenbrink. “Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age.” Theatre Journal 67.1 (March, 2013). p. 412. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Jeanie C. Crain.”Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age.”  Journal of American Culture 38.3 (September, 2015). pp.308-309. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Peter Civetta. “Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age by John Fletcher, and: Sensational Devotion: Evangelical Performance in Twenty-First Century America by Jill Stevenson (review).” TDR 59.4 (Winter 2015) T228. pp. 194-197. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Deborah A. Dougherty.”Preaching to Convert: Evangelical Outreach and Performance Activism in a Secular Age by John Fletcher and Sensational Devotion: Evangelical Performance in Twenty-First Century America by Jill Stevenson.” Theatre Survey 56.3 (September, 2015). pp. 443-446. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

  • J. Fisher. “The Cambridge companion to theatre history, ed. by David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski.” Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries. 51.3 (November, 2013). p.471. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Maggie B. Gale. “Wiles, David and Dymkowski, ChristineThe Cambridge Companion to Theatre History.” New Theatre Quarterly 30.4 (November, 2014) 404-405. Available online [may require subscriber login]
  • Scott Magelssen. “The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History.” TDR 58.4/T224 (Winter 2014). Available online [may require subscriber login]

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Ann Folino White. Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2015.

  • Michael Schwartz.  “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White (review).” Theatre Journal 67.4 (December, 2015). pp.758-59. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Todd Holmes. “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White (review).” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 114.1 (Winter 2016). pp. 122-124. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • J. Chris Westgate. “Plowed Under: Food Policy Protests and Performance in New Deal America by Ann Folino White.” Journal Of American History 102.3 (December, 2015). pp.917-918. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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Dwight Conquergood. Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis. Edited by E. Patrick Johnson. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013.

  • Laurie Frederik. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” Theatre Journal 66.4 (December 2014) p. 344. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Renée Alexander Craft. Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” TDR 59.1 (Spring 2015) (T225). Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Scott Irelan. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, edited by E. Patrick Johnson (review).” Choice Reviews Dec 2013. Available online  [may require subscriber login].
  • Bryant Keith Alexander. “Books in Performance Studies: Reviews and Reflections (review essay).” Text and Performance Quarterly 34.4 (October, 2014). pp. 416-433. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Norman K. Denzin. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood, auth. and E. Patrick Johnson, ed. (review).” American Anthropologist 116.3 (September, 2014) pp. 676-677. Available online [may require subscriber login].
  • Hari Stephen Kumar. “Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis. Dwight Conquergood, (edited by E. Patrick Johnson).”Anthropology & Education Quarterly 45.4 (2014) pp.415-417. Available online [may require subscriber login].

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MD_58_4_2015

Modern Drama, Volume 58, Number 4, Winter 2015 is now available at Modern Drama Online and Project MUSE.

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CTR_164_Fall_2015_(3X3)NOW AVAILABLE AT CTR ONLINE  –  CTR 164, Fall 2015 “Vancouver after 2010”

Also available on Project MUSE 

A startling correspondence across former Olympic and Paralympic host cities is that aggressive social welfare cuts have followed the event. These cuts have serious material consequences for those very artists and minority groups that proved so central to winning bids and staging Opening and Closing ceremonies. Five years after the 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, with the city’s arts communities still recovering from a series of provincial funding cuts that actually began in 2009, and with post-Olympics development projects encroaching on artist live-work spaces, this special issue of Canadian Theatre Reviewbrings together scholars, artists, and cultural producers to ask what kinds of resources remain after a mega-event has left town? How do artists and companies adapt to new economic circumstances and leverage audience attention for and investment in new projects? And what might a reading of the specific aesthetic, social, and affective legacies of different Olympics- and Paralympics-related performances tell us about the state of arts and culture in Vancouver today? From public art and sound walks, to hockey games and real estate speculation, this issue reveals the pervasive power of the Olympics to continue to shape how Vancouverites move through and live within the city. Fix, the published script by award-winning playwright Alex Bulmer, demonstrates how citizens of host cities from Vancouver to London must continually renew the fight to the right to the city. Bulmer’s “audio provocation” seeks to engage youth in the deep questions of citizenship, particularly concerning disability and inclusion. Her script is one of many battle cries in this issue that show art and performance to be more than a stage for official culture, but a political force with which to be reckoned.

Click here to read the full introduction.

You can also access CTR on the various online platforms below.

CTR Online (http://bit.ly/CTRONLINE)

Project MUSE (http://bit.ly/ctrPMUSE)

CTR on YouTube (http://bit.ly/ctrYTUBEVIDEOS)

Website (www.canadiantheatrereview.com)

Facebook (http://bit.ly/CTRFaceBook)
Kobo Newsstand (http://bit.ly/CTRkobonewsstand)
Magazines Canada’s Cultural Boutique (http://bit.ly/CTR49thShelf)

Join CTR email list!

Please sign up for important news relating to Canadian Theatre Review. You’ll receive emails with peeks inside new issues, Tables of Contents, Calls for Papers, editorial announcements, open access articles, and special offers. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking “Unsubscribe” in the footer of our emails. Sign up herebit.ly/ctralerts

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